Timeline

1840-1899
1840: Missouri Medical College founded as part of Kemper College. Noted surgeon Joseph Nash McDowell was its dean.

1842: St. Louis Medical College founded as part of Saint Louis University (separated from SLU in 1855). Its early lead surgeon was Charles Alexander Pope.
1891: St. Louis Medical College becomes Medical Department of Washington University (Washington University School of Medicine established).
 
 1900-1919
1902: Jewish Hospital opens.

1910: Training of urologic surgeons begins with appointment of John Caulk as professor of clinical genitourinary surgery.

1914: Barnes Hospital opens. Frederick Murphy appointed surgeon-in-chief

 Chairman_Murphy

Frederick T. Murphy, M.D.
1914-19

1919: Evarts Graham appointed first Bixby Professor and full-time chairman of the Department of Surgery. Soon after, he establishes "chest service" for thoracic surgery. Graham serves until 1951.

 

Evarts A. Graham, M.D.
1919-51

 
 1920-1939
1924: Department researchers develop cholecystography for visualization of the gallbladder.

1925: Vilray Blair appointed first division chief of plastic and reconstructive surgery.
1931: Construction completed on Rand-Johnson Surgical Wing at Barnes Hospital.

1933: Evarts Graham performs first successful one-stage pneumonectomy for cancer.
 
 1940-1959
1942: James Barrett Brown joins U.S. Army as European Senior Consultant in Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery. Brown assembles a large team of plastic surgeons to treat wounded veterans returning from World War II, leading to new techniques and strengthening plastic surgeons' role in hand reconstruction.

1951: Carl Moyer named chairman. He serves until 1965.

1953: Justin Cordonnier becomes first full-time head of urologic surgery.

 Chairman_Moyer

Carl A. Moyer, M.D.
1951-65

 
 1960-1979
1962: Washington University Medical Center established.

1963: William Newton performs Barnes Hospital's first kidney transplant.

1967: Walter Ballinger named chairman. He serves until 1978.

1968: Separate clinical service for pediatric cardiothoracic patients created at St. Louis Children's Hospital.

1972: Pediatric surgery division established.

1973: Kidney transplant program established at Barnes Hospital.

 Chairman_Ballinger

Walter F. Ballinger, M.D.
1967-78

 
 1980-1989
1981: Samuel Wells Jr. named chairman. He serves until 1997.

1985: Washington University surgeons establish world's 16th liver transplant program at Barnes Hospital

1987: Researchers in cardiothoracic surgery division led by James Cox develop surgical cure for atrial fibrillation.

1988: Cardiothoracic surgery division creates separate service for general thoracic surgery.

 Chairman_Wells

Samuel A. Wells, Jr., M.D.
1981-97

 

 
 1990-1999
1990: Urologic surgery division performs first laparoscopic nephrectomy.

1993: Washington University Institute for Minimally Invasive Surgery (WUIMIS) established.

1996: Barnes-Jewish Hospital created by merger of Barnes Hospital and The Jewish Hospital of St. Louis.

1996: Washington University transplant surgeons at Barnes-Jewish Hospital perform first adult-to-adult living donor liver transplant in the United States.

1998: Current Bixby Professor and chairman Timothy Eberlein appointed.

1999: Timothy Eberlein appointed director of the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine.

 Chairman_Eberlein

Timothy J. Eberlein, M.D.
1998-

   
 2000-Present  

2001: Opening of Center for Advanced Medicine adjacent to the old Jewish Hospital as site for providing state-of-the-art outpatient care.

2004: New modified Cox-Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation - developed by Washington University cardiac surgeons - shown to be as effective as traditional open procedure.

2005: Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center designated a Comprehensive Cancer Center by National Cancer Institute.

2005: Twenty-eight new operating rooms, cardiothoracic ICU open at Barnes-Jewish Hospital as part of three-year renewal project.

2007: Section of Minimally Invasive Surgery established within the Division of General Surgery.

2008: First U.S. incision-free procedure for obesity performed at Washington University.

2010: Division of Public Health Sciences founded to prevent disease, promote health and improve quality and access to health care.