Embracing Life With an Ostomy Bag

Ostomy surgery can be life altering – but for many patients, it can uncover a newfound sense of freedom and a new outlook on life.

Top Doctors 2022

Top Doctors 2022 WashU Surgery

Congratulations to the Department of Surgery faculty recognized on the 2022 Castle Connolly Top Doctors® list.

Called to Serve

Sean Glasgow in the operating room

When Sean Glasgow, MD, is not serving as a faculty member, he’s serving the United States military as a citizen Airman at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois. For Glasgow, being both a surgeon and a member of the medical team at the Air Force Reserve is incredibly rewarding. 

Inflammatory Bowel Disease or Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Comparison of IBS and IBD symptoms with medical illustration of the digestive system.

Inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome are two different gastrointestinal conditions. Learn more about each, and how Washington University Colon & Rectal Surgery provides team-based care for inflammatory bowel disease.

What is HIPEC Surgery?

Hyperthermic or heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) surgery is a two-step procedure that treats certain cancers in the abdomen. This is a procedure conducted by surgeons in the Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Ask the Doctor: Colorectal Cancer with the Colorectal Team

Colorectal Cancer Team

Colorectal cancer is a type of cancer that develops in the lower intestine, either the colon or rectum, and causes symptoms such as bowel movement changes, pain and weight loss as it progresses. It is a common cancer that is often detected through regular screening and requires physician diagnosis from specific tests. Colorectal cancer is preventable, treatable and curable through surgical and radiation treatments. Washington University School of Medicine and Siteman Cancer Center provide patients with screening, diagnoses and treatment options.

Ask the Doctor: Diverticulitis with Dr. Kerri Ohman

Diverticulitis is the inflammation or infection of diverticula, small pouches commonly occurring in the colon. The presence of diverticula is known as diverticulosis. If one or several diverticula become inflamed or infected, diverticulitis develops. Diverticulitis causes abdominal pain, fever, nausea and a changes in bowel habits. Mild diverticulitis can be treated with rest, changes in diet and use of antibiotics, but severe or persistent attacks of diverticulitis requires surgery.

The Importance of Comfort: Patient Gender Selection in Colorectal Surgery

Colorectal screening, diagnosis and treatment are integral parts of overall health, but obstacles related to patient comfort can prevent effective medical intervention for colorectal illness. Having a diverse, accessible department of colorectal surgeons reassures patients and advances the optimal benefits for their colorectal health.

Growing the Peritoneal Disease Program

Beth Helmink, MD, PhD, and Sean Glasgow, MD, discuss the peritoneal disease program at Washington University School of Medicine.

Top Doctors 2021

Congratulations to the Department of Surgery faculty recognized on the 2021 Castle Connolly Top Doctors® list.

Pediatric Surgery | 2020 Annual Report

Two images of WashU Pediatric Surgery faculty (from left to right) Baddr Shakhsheer, MD, and Brad Warner, MD, and Jessie Vrecenak, MD, with text overlay that reads "Ahead of the Curve Pediatric Surgery.”

The Department of Surgery 2020 Annual Report features clinical, research and educational accomplishments from the Division of Pediatric Surgery.

Community Practice | Department of Surgery 2020 Annual Report

Two images of WashU faculty (from left to right) Kerri Ohman, MD, and Arnold Bullock, MD, with text overlay that reads "Ahead of the Curve with Christian Hospital.”

In addition to providing care on the Medical Campus, Washington University surgeons extend patient care to community practice across the St. Louis region at locations including Christian Hospital and Alton Memorial Hospital.

The Rewarding Aspects of Being a Surgeon: with Kerri Ohman, MD

Dr. Kerri Ohman in the WISE lab with surgical residents.

Kerri Ohman, MD, who joined the Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery in 2020 as an Assistant Professor of Surgery, shares her journey of becoming a colorectal surgeon and explains why she likes working at Washington University .

Colorectal Cancer Care

Washington University Colon and Rectal provides the highest level of care for patients with colorectal cancer.

Ask the Doctors: Crohn’s Disease

Matthew Mutch, MD, Chief of the Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery and Professor of Surgery, and faculty from the Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery answer some of the most frequently asked questions about Crohn’s disease.

Campus Catch-Up

The Washington University campus community is making headlines every day. Members of the School of Medicine are regularly featured in local, national and international news stories. Department of Surgery faculty, staff and medical students are leaders in their specialties, and share their expertise when called upon.